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Home to both scenic rolling hills and beautiful coastlines, Dorset is a beautiful holiday destination. As you’re sure to have the time of your life while visiting on your cottage break in Dorset, wouldn’t it be a good idea to take some photos as a pleasant reminder for the future? If you’re planning on taking plenty of snapshots during your stay, here’s our look at some of the best places to capture across the county.

Durdle Door

Undoubtedly one of Dorset’s most famous landmarks, Durdle Door is a natural limestone arch which can be found near Lulworth in Dorset. This natural wonder draws thousands of Brits to the coast and the fact that it is made of limestone means that it is constantly eroding away as time passes. It’s a particularly beautiful sight at dusk, when the last embers of sunlight illuminate the night sky.

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Lulworth Castle

While Lulworth Castle doesn’t boast the same incredible history as other castles in the UK, this 17th century mock castle found just to the south of Wool offers a unique photo opportunity that certainly shouldn’t be passed up. Completed in 1609 and originally serving as a hunting lodge, it was then used as a garrison after being seized by the Roundheads during the English Civil War. Today it leads a far less dramatic existence as a museum and tourist attraction, and while the interior is well worth a snapshot, the winning photo has to be of its unique exterior.

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Lulworth Cove

A delightful, circular cove found just around the corner from Durdle Door, Lulworth Cove is a defining feature of the Jurassic Coast and a hotspot for relaxing in the sun. Even in the winter months it is worth visiting, with the quiet atmosphere and calm waters making it a great place to sit and reflect. The cove itself was formed around 10,000 years ago and today it continues to evolve as the Purbeck rocks, Wealden, greensand and chalk are continually eroded by the oncoming tides. If you’re looking for a sunset location, it will be hard to find a better spot during your luxury cottage break. It’s worth bearing in mind that the clifftop path at Lulworth Cove is within a restricted MoD area and is only open on weekends and the whole of August.

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Golden Cap

The highest point on both the Jurassic Coast and the South West Coast Path, and rising just short of 200m above sea level, Golden Cap is certainly the best location from which to capture this ancient stretch of coastline in all its glory. It has earned its name because of its unique appearance, with golden greensand left exposed at the very top of the cliff. You can reach the summit of the cliff using the path from Seatown, and the 40-minute walk up to the top is well worth the effort because of the incredible image opportunities.

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Gold Hill

Famous for featuring in the Hovis Advert and also featuring in our guide to the Prettiest Streets in the South West, Gold Hill is a steep cobbled street in the town of Shaftesbury and is often described as one of the most romantic sights in England. Being such a unique place means that it’s also one of the most photographed places in Dorset, perhaps because people at home will not believe such a paradise exists until you show them the proof.

Old Harry Rocks

Bearing a striking resemblance to The Needles off the coast of the Isle of Wight, Old Harry Rocks is found at Handfast Point on the Isle of Purbeck. Made of chalk, the rocks mark the most easterly point of the Jurassic Coast and taking the time to view them is definitely worth your while. According to legend, they are named so because the Devil – once familiarly known as Old Harry –slept on the rocks.

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Chesil Beach

We finish as we began: by the sea. One of just three major shingle structures across the whole of England, Chesil Beach is a stunning sight on a summer’s day and well worth a photo. The pebble beach stretches for 18 miles from Portland to West Bay, and varies from 900m to 65m wide depending on where you are. It has also been used as a filming location in popular TV series Broadchurch, with its dramatic appearance suiting the theme of the show and making it ideal for photographers too.

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